AAA and Developmental Dynamics kick off a new webinar series. Inspiring Scientific Curiosity & Discovery brings anatomy research from the journal pages to an interactive webinar format, where attendees can learn more about what's behind the research. Get into the science and get inspired!

Upcoming Webinars

We're taking a break for June and July. Check back soon for updates! 

On-Demand Webinars

RNA regulation in pancreatic islet development and function

Speaker: Dr. Lori Sussel, University of Colorado
May 27, 2021

The pancreas is a flat elongated pear shaped organ positioned behind the stomach. It is part of the digestive system and endocrine system of vertebrates. The pancreas synthesizes pancreatic juices, which contain enzymes that aid in digestion, and it produces several hormones, including insulin which regulates blood sugar levels. But what controls pancreas development and function? To date, only a handful of regulatory have been thoroughly characterized and many of the molecular pathways that specify islet cell differentiation and function are poorly understood.


Discovering How Muscle Develops, Regenerates, and Evolves

Speaker: Gabrielle Kardon, Ph.D., University of Utah
March 25, 2021

How does muscle develop, regenerate, maintain, age, and evolve? These are the questions that drive our research. We focus on muscle stem cells because they are the source of all muscle. We focus on the muscle connective tissue because it provides the niche for muscle stem cells and is critical for muscle form and function. We study how interactions between muscle stem cells and the connective tissue orchestrate development of limb muscles and the diaphragm, regulate muscle regeneration and aging, are the source of birth defects and fibrosis, and shape evolution of the musculoskeletal system. 


The Difficulty in Reconciling Dogma with Data

Speaker: Ralph Marcucio, Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco
February 25, 2021

Sometimes the data that are generated by experiments are very far from what is anticipated. As part of a translational project using cartilage to heal large bone defects, we discovered that chondrocytes transform into osteoblasts. This outcome contradicts more than 100 years of dogma that apoptosis is the terminal fate of chondrocytes, and has led to a discovery of new mechanisms of bone regeneration.